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Kristen Bell & Dax Shepard Get Real About Their Marriage, Their Kids & All Those Rumors

Kristen Bell & Dax Shepard Get Real About Their Marriage, Their Kids & All Those Rumors

PARADE MAGAZINE

They may look like a picture-perfect couple, but it wasn’t exactly love at first sight for Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard when they met at a mutual friend’s birthday dinner in 2007.

“Neither of us was bowled over,” says Shepard, 44, revealing that they were both in the midst of breakups. But two weeks later, they bumped into each other at a hockey game, where both Michigan natives were cheering on their beloved Detroit Red Wings against the Los Angeles Kings.

Bell jokes that her interest was piqued when Shepard asked if she had any chewing gum. She said, “Just this,” and removed the piece she was chewing. He took it, ripped it in two and popped half into his mouth. “I was like, ‘Oh, these signals are clear!’” she recalls. Several days later, Shepard tracked down her number, and they’ve been together ever since. Today they’re one of Hollywood’s most endearing—and enduring—power couples: They’re married with two daughters, and both have high-profile careers. Currently, Bell stars as Eleanor Shellstrop on the hit NBC sitcom The Good Place and Shepard plays Luke Matthews on The Ranch.

If you’re wondering if they have the same chemistry in real life as they do on screen (they’ve co-starred in a number of movies as well as those adorable Samsung commercials), the answer is yes. Their relationship is a walking rom-com, a mix of playful, witty banter and gestures of affection, like Shepard arranging for a baby sloth (her favorite animal) to pay his wife a visit, or Bell convincing the King’s Hawaiian bread factory to gift her man the chance to devour rolls fresh out of their oven (his lifelong dream). The duo would completely agree that the Samsung commercials accurately depict their real life.

“Dax has 100 percent creative control over those,” says Bell. “So we do silly things, like wear matching Christmas pajamas, which we actually do.”

Opposites Attract

That’s not to say they don’t have their differences. In the early days, Shepard was a self-proclaimed bad boy, while Bell was focused on philanthropy and her friends. “I believed the whole world was filled with sheep and he believed the whole world was filled with wolves,” she says.

They admit to bringing out the best in each other. Since meeting his wife, Shepard is “less naïve, 10 times nicer,” and Bell has gotten “better with boundaries.” But she says that they still “agree on almost nothing.”

“When we’re walking down the street and we pass someone, my first thought is, This guy’s gonna try to take my wallet,” says Shepard. “Kristen’s first thought is, That guy might cure cancer.”

They do, however, share some similarities. For starters, they’re extremely frugal. “Even that first dinner we were at, I remember Kristen talking about some deal she had gotten at Target,” says Shepard, who found that “extremely attractive.” And both being from the suburbs of Detroit unifies them. “We were grown from the same seeds and watered with the same rain,” says Bell.

Both acknowledge that their relationship takes work. “This isn’t a special fairytale,” she says. “This is two people who worked really hard and it’s attainable for you if you work really hard in your marriage too,” adds Shepard.

Bell and Shepard got engaged in 2009 but held off on making things official until California legalized same-sex marriage. Once passed, Bell proposed to her fiancé in a tweet and they wed at the Beverly Hills county clerk’s office in 2013. It was simple and understated; the entire ceremony reportedly cost under $150 and everything was exactly the way they wanted.

Bell laughs as she recalls that hours after the ceremony, she was back to work on her TV sitcom House of Lies, filming an intimate scene with her co-star Ryan Hansen, one of their best friends—whose wife, Amy, had been their wedding witness and photographer.

The couple, who recently celebrated five years as husband and wife, often forget their anniversary. Fortunately, like clockwork every year, Bell’s mother texts them a reminder. “We both wake up, check our phones and we go, ‘Happy anniversary,’” says Bell. “We’ve been together 11 and a half years. We’re much prouder of that than marriage,” says Shepard, who reveals that his favorite thing about his wife is her thoughtful nature. “She’s regularly going out of her way to anticipate some need you might have that maybe you didn’t even recognize.”

Bell admires her husband’s “endless patience with people,” joking that she takes an eternity to tell a story but Shepard hangs in ’til the end. She also finds it sexy that he’s so direct and has become the “go-to therapist” for her girlfriends. “They’ll say to me, ‘Is Dax going to be home tonight? I want to run something by him.’”

Shepard humorously equates himself to “Simon Cowell on the first season of American Idol.” “I’ll just tell them, ‘Get real! You’ve done this with eight boyfriends. At what point is it your problem?’”

With hectic schedules, nabbing time with one another can be difficult. But Bell says, if life pulls them in opposite directions, they’ll hunker down and say, “Hey! We’ve got to hang.” Sometimes that simply means finding a new Netflix show to binge; their current obsession is Patriot on Amazon Prime. They also aren’t big on date nights.

“We’ve probably had nine in the last six years, if we’re being honest,” and much prefer intimate group hangs with friends and their children, daughters Lincoln, 5, and Delta, 4. “We play board games and the kids destroy the house and that’s just a fun Sunday,” he says.

‘We’re Boring’

Though they often grace your television screens and are hyped as a power couple, their real life is not so much different than anyone else’s—except for having to deal with millions of people’s perceptions of them. There are always rumors flying around, which Shepard finds hilarious. “We’re boring, so when they print these things—that we’re swingers and stuff—it gives us a little edge that we don’t have,” he jokes.

In addition to Bell’s current prime-time starring role alongside Ted Dansonon TV’s The Good Place, she’s also gearing up for the reboot of Veronica Mars later this year on Hulu. And she’ll reprise her role as the voice of Princess Anna in Disney’s mega-hit animated musical Frozen when the sequel, Frozen 2, arrives in November. Shepard is a writer, director and producer with more than five dozen TV and movie credits on his résumé, including the role of Crosby Braverman in Parenthood and voicing several characters on the Adult Swim animated series Robot Chicken. His movie comedies include Employee of the MonthWithout a Paddle and Idiocracy.

But their celebrity doesn’t make them any more put-together. “We’re behind on laundry, our house is a mess, there’s dog hair that we’re trying to constantly Swiffer,” says Bell, who discloses that things got even wilder when their children entered the picture.

“They leave stuff everywhere! It’s like they booby-trap the house and sometimes they actually do booby-trap the house,” she says, noting that she once found pieces of gum taped to the seat of a chair. “Our oldest builds forts and a good half the week all the couch cushions are off. No one can sit on the couch and the only thing that’s exposed are crumbs!”

Shepard is the disciplinarian and refers to Bell as the “endlessly patient and generous” parent. “They’re whiniest with me because they know they can get away with it,” she says. Her husband, who is completely outnumbered by females, jokes that he sometimes finds himself palling around with dad friends, eager to soak up whatever testosterone he can find. “My sister works with us, Monica [Padman] co-hosts my podcast, my mom lives with us half the year, even our dog is a female!” he says.

Bell does the majority of the housework and is completely OK with that. “I don’t have this secret feminist inside me that wishes he would cook four nights a week. I want him out of my kitchen!” she jokes. Shepard keeps the cars running, gets the Christmas lights up the day after Halloween and is a mean dishwasher. He’s banned from putting them away, however, as Bell teasingly suggests he often complicates her system.

#CoupleGoals

There is no one who raves about Bell more than Shepard. “I can’t watch Kristen sing live without becoming a mess. I start this weird thing, which is about to turn into a cry, but I keep it in the laugh zone so I just laugh neurotically with wet eyes,” says Shepard. Bell—who grew up loving opera and sang in various solo and ensemble competitions in college—welcomes the praise, since her kids are immune to their mom’s Frozen success. “I’m not allowed to sing around my girls. Whenever I sing, even to the radio, they cover my mouth,” she says.

And Bell is a huge fan of Shephard’s Armchair Expert, his weekly podcast which has attracted celebrities including Jay LenoSarah SilvermanConan O’Brien and Ethan Hawke for wide-ranging conversation and topical probing. “When he told me he wanted to start a podcast in the garage, I said ‘Oh, honey, that’s so cute.’ A month later, I was like, “You have a million subscribers?” she recalls. “It’s my Frozen!” quips Shepard.

Besides sharing the screen in films, including When in Rome, the movie remake of CHiPs and the comedy-romance Hit & Run, which Shepard wrote and directed, they’ve embarked on a new joint adventure.

Their latest venture is Hello Bello, a plant-based baby-product line currently available at Walmart. “We wanted people to have access to baby products they felt good about that didn’t kill their pocketbook,” explains Bell, who says she and Shepard had fun collaborating. “He was saying, ‘Let’s put the word ‘butt’ on the packaging for the diapers and ‘booger’ on the wipes,’ which makes total sense. Why are we trying to pretend these are elegant products? They’re not!”

And of course, being married to anyone in the same line of work—like a fellow actor—has its advantages. “It’s a great antidote to your ego,” says Shepard. “If I go, ‘But, honey, I gotta go do X, Y and Z,’ she’ll go, ‘Yeah—I did that last week. You’re not that special!’”

Check the pictures in our gallery:

Photo Sessions & Outtakes > 2019 > Parade Magazine

Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard Had to ‘Work Really, Really Hard’ to Find Happily Ever After

Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard Had to ‘Work Really, Really Hard’ to Find Happily Ever After

People

Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard sat down exclusively with PEOPLE for its latest cover story and opened up about marriage, parenting and more.

Each product we feature has been independently selected and reviewed by our editorial team. If you make a purchase using the links included, we may earn commission.

Kristen Bell and Dax Shepard define #CoupleGoals, but they’re the first to admit their nearly 12 years together have been filled with ups and downs.

We definitely had to work really hard at being a couple because we’re both incredibly, painfully stubborn, and we’re pretty much opposites,Shepard, 44, tells PEOPLE exclusively in this week’s cover story, on stands Friday.

After crossing paths briefly at a dinner party in 2007, the couple — who wed in 2013 and have two daughters, Lincoln, 5, and Delta, 4 — reconnected weeks later at a hockey game where “the sparks were flying,” says The Ranchstar. Adds Bell, 38: “Big time.

Though they had undeniable chemistry, both say their road to marriage was certainly rocky. Not quite ready to settle down at the time, Shepard broke up with Bell months into their relationship.

But just a few days later, the stars — who recently launched an affordable, plant-based baby product line called Hello Bello — reunited after Shepard changed his mind.

“I was like, ‘That’s the best personality I’ve ever seen on a woman. I need to be around it,” recalls Shepard. “I want to be around it when I’m 80, but how?”

The answer was trust and honesty plus “a little couple’s therapy” — and a very meaningful compromise.

Knowing Shepard didn’t believe in marriage, the Bad Moms actress had accepted she would never be his wife.

“He has a great argument that the state having a piece of paper doesn’t mean he’s going to be nice to me and by my side for the rest of my life. [Rather], that is going to be evidenced by how we treat each other and the commitment that we make,” says Bell. “I had surrendered, like ‘Okay, well, I’m never going to get any sort of traditional marriage out of this, and that’s okay because I trust him.’ I really, really trusted him and believed that we were going to go the long haul.”

But Shepard knew how much marriage meant to Bell, and “ultimately, I was like, ‘Well, I’m doing it because my partner wants that,” he explains about proposing in 2009. “Forget the tradition or history of marriage as a concept, you knowing I was doing something that I didn’t want to do because I loved you was a big sign for you.”

After their intimate, courthouse nuptials in 2013, the couple — who often buck tradition — did feel a greater sense of security.

Check the pictures in our gallery:

Photo Sessions & Outtakes > 2019 > People Magazine

Magazine Scans > 2019 > People Magazine

Kristen Bell worries Disney princesses teach her daughters bad lessons

Kristen Bell worries Disney princesses teach her daughters bad lessons

Parents magazine

When it comes to stranger danger and conversations around consent, Frozen’s Anna has a lot of questions for Snow White.
Kristen Bell: ‘I couldn’t be Stepford if I tried’

Kristen Bell: ‘I couldn’t be Stepford if I tried’

The Guardian

She’s made philosophy fun in The Good Place, has a model marriage and still finds time for charity work. No wonder Kristen Bell struggles to keep it all together

Thanks to The Good Place, Bell can now crisply outline the debate between Kantian and utilitarian philosophy. But at this moment, right in the middle of a sentence describing her personal belief in moral particularism, Bell is stumped by something she can’t explain. “Look at that. What is that?” she blurts, extracting a pair of industrial-sized shapewear knickers out of her purse. “I can’t explain.” Then she pulls out one sock, then an entirely different mismatched sock, and then a mangled sticking plaster. “I don’t know,” she sighs. Just one more mystery in the universe.

She is very visible – a blonde in a bright shirt in a restaurant where everyone else is wearing black, and the most famous face in the place – yet brandishing her underwear doesn’t make her blush. “One thing I really want to do publicly – like on social media – is a, ‘What’s in my bag?’” she says, referring to the fashion magazine features that are usually just plugs for lip gloss. “Like actually videotape myself and go, ‘This is no bullshit. Here is what’s in my fucking bag.’

In The Good Place, Bell would be forced to substitute “bullshirt” and “forking” for those swear words. On Earth, her goal is to tell everything like it is, as though every day is an exercise in Celebrity Demystification. She is publicly seen as a Very Good Person, an empath who volunteers for a half-dozen charities. Thanks to The Good Place – and honestly, just being a celebrity in these tumultuous, take-a-stand years – she is often turned to as an oracle of ethics. “I personally think it’s a responsibility that if you’re lucky enough to have been handed a microphone in your short time on this planet, use it. Use it.

Within her radius, I tip extra, and yet she still tips twice as much. And yet she prefers to play characters who are selfish creeps. “That’s what I feel like!” she protests. “Look, I consider myself a very nice person and there are plenty of times I want to scream at someone on the street. And Eleanor does that – she tells people to eat their farts.

Bell and her husband, the comedian and actor Dax Shepard, are aware that their marriage inspires awe. While they were dating, he surprised her on her birthday with a live sloth, and her ecstatic, sobbing meltdown went viral. The day the supreme court legalised gay marriage, she proposed to him on Twitter. Internet strangers reply to their tweets with hashtags such as #RelationshipGoals. Instead of leaning into the mystique, Bell prefers to talk about the hard work they do every day to stay together. Couples therapy, sobriety, the challenges of monogamy, and their constant bickering, which they recently allowed people to eavesdrop on during an episode of Shepard’s podcast Armchair Expert, where they relitigated whether or not he gawped at her chest on their first date.

I’m the polar opposite of my husband and that is not hyperbolic. We disagree on 99.9% of things and we argue all the time,” says Bell with affection. The 0.1% of things they share, she notes, are crucial. “We both have the type of brain that likes to be stimulated by the devil’s advocate point of view, so it totally works.” Plus, they were both born in Michigan.

As a child, Bell was a talented mimic. She would repeat unusual accents, Broadway warbles, even entire Lee Press-On Nails commercials from memory. Her parents split up before she was born, so to help her single mother earn extra cash, Bell began modelling for local newspaper ads when she was a pre-teen. She was small and cute, which made her perfect for posing with karaoke machines and kids’ bikes. “Every now and then, someone would bring a circular to school and be like, ‘Is this you? Ew!’” says Bell. “Kmart underwear and training bras was particularly embarrassing.” Her mother, a practising Christian, enrolled her in a Catholic high school, where she heard all the conservative fear-mongering that kept her gay friends from musical theatre hidden in the closet. Despite her daily religion classes, Bell refused to mimic their homophobia. “Definitely, people in my community had the same idea about lifestyles they were unfamiliar with, but I never had a point where I remember going, ‘Oh, being gay is OK!’ I was always like, ‘What are you talking about?’”

I was so hungry for weirdos,” says Bell. “I couldn’t be Stepford if I tried.” She pauses and reconsiders. “Well, maybe I could fit that box, but I don’t want the people around me to fit that box.” So as soon as she graduated, she moved to New York. “My first memories were just being slack-jawed at the amount of stimuli from other people and immediately recognising that I found my people.” They were in her acting classes, in her first gigs on Broadway, and even today, she refers to the crew of The Good Place as “my family members”. Bell uses the word “tribe” a lot. It’s part of her current thinking about how humanity can improve. Now that she has producer-level clout, her last three projects have instituted what she calls a “no jerks policy”. This includes no sexual harassment, no making people uncomfortable, no passive aggressiveness, and if she spots a director being rude to a crew member, they won’t be hired back.

Recently, she went to a lecture by the cognitive psychologist Steven Pinker and has fixated on caveman behaviour, which she refers to as the “outdated software in our brains”. Her cornerstone belief is that humans weren’t meant to live in large groups, not even places as fabulous as Manhattan. That we were meant to live in villages of 115 people, max, which is why we tend to be immediately suspicious of anyone unfamiliar. “If you and I met a couple thousand years ago in a field, we would probably kill each other,” she explains, with her friendliest smile.

Today, we’re less violent – at least, face to face – yet online, especially in 2018, that primal group-think is being battled with keyboards instead of clubs. “After the [presidential] election, the amount of hatred I saw from everywhere made me feel – and I could dare speak for my collaborators on the show – that The Good Place was more important.” This is good timing, as the show’s third season, which premieres on Netflix on Friday 28 September, starts off with Eleanor and her afterlife friends Chidi (William Jackson Harper), Tahani (Jameela Jamil) and Jason (Manny Jacinto) alive and back on Earth with their deaths reversed, stumbling through a second chance at self-improvement, which comes with a new round of sinful temptations, such as when fatuous philanthropist Tahani publishes a best-selling book on enlightenment that gives her the Oprah-level fame she desperately craved.

There’s no bigger space that egos exist than in the non-profit world,” says Bell. Tahanis are real – and she would know. Bell’s current list of charities covers a staggering amount of ground: animal rights, prostate cancer, stem cell donation, Alzheimer’s disease, international child hunger, domestic chid poverty and young mothers raised in foster care. On birthdays, she and her friends prefer to furnish apartments for homeless people transitioning off the street rather than going out to a bar, and, this week, she will make her United Nations debut as an ambassador for the Women’s Peace and Humanitarian Fund.

My job is not to go into politics,Bell stresses. “My job is that I have the ear of 18-year-olds because of The Good Place or Forgetting Sarah Marshall.” It is almost impossible to imagine how she fits everything in. “Honestly, every day you quit at seven, throw in the towel, scream, and then wake up and do it all over again,” she admits. “I know from the outside it can look like, ‘Oh! She’s got it so together! And has a career that looks nice and is doing all these things with these charities.’ But I am struggling to keep it together on a day-to-day basis, and I know that’s what everyone feels like, so that’s what I like to see in my characters.

Still, she is questioning how much Hollywood loves anti-heroes. There are plenty of them in the news – do we still need them on Netflix? (Witness Bell and Kelsey Grammer as an estranged daughter and father in Like Father.) Is there a way to break Hollywood’s insistence on pitting heroes against jerks, especially when most people, even her, are both? Bell points to Frozen, the Disney blockbuster for which she voiced the lonely Princess Anna. In the first versions of the script, the frosty Princess Elsa was more of a traditional bad guy. What if they broke the mould? “In the final draft, it was like, ‘No, not only does she not need to be forgiven for anything, she’s the most sympathetic character in the whole piece,’” says Bell. “It’s a much more complex story when there’s no villain.

“I want to watch someone fight for the underdog, I want to watch a hero without a cape,” says Bell. “I want to watch someone trying to be good like Eleanor.” Which means it’s the right time to resurrect Veronica Mars, the TV show about a teen detective that made her a household name. Next month, she is jumping back into production for eight new episodes that will premiere – in the US next year. “It’s not high-school crime any more,” says Bell. “It’s going to be Veronica as an adult, so it’s going to be different … and I mean that from an emotional perspective of what Veronica’s dealing with. She’s going to take on much bigger problems.

For now, though, Bell is continuing to handle her ordinary problems, such as answering her daughters’ questions about death. “When you tell [your kids] some gigantic mythical story that they can sense is not true, they know you’re lying to them,” she says. Reading her kids scripts of The Good Place as bedtime stories, with its flying shrimps and roguish devils, is out. Yet her kids seem to be absorbing her own straight-shooting spirit. Recently, while preparing for the death of their grandfather, her five-year-old shocked her with another huge question: Did she need to pack her toy shovel for when he passed away? And where were they burying the body? On the side of his house? Bell beams with pride. “She was all problem-solving!

Check the pictures in our gallery:

Photo Sessions & Outtakes > 2018 > The Guardian

Kristen Bell may play Veronica Mars again in Hulu Revival

Kristen Bell may play Veronica Mars again in Hulu Revival

Deadline – Rob Thomas’ cult favorite noir mystery drama Veronica Mars starring Kristen Bell is making another comeback, this time as an eight-episode limited series at Hulu.

I hear the streaming platform is finalizing deals for the new installment, with star Bell set to reprise her role as sleuth Veronica Mars. I hear there have been preliminary conversations about bringing back a number of the other cast members from the original series and follow-up movie.

Doing Veronica Mars is not going to interfere with Bell’s duties as star of the NBC comedy series The Good Place.

As he has done with all things Veronica Mars-related, Thomas is said to be shepherding the project through Warner Horizon TV, the cable/streaming division of Warner Bros TV, which produced the original series. Reps for Hulu and WBTV declined comment.

Created by Thomas, Veronica Mars was a critical darling and developed a devoted following during its three-season run from 2004-2007 on UPN and then on the CW.

Fueled by fan support, a successful Kickstarter campaign for a movie sequel launched in 2013 by Thomas and Bell raised $3.7 million in a matter of hours. The film, toplined by Bell and featuring a number of other original cast members, was released by Warner Bros in 2014.

The same year, Play It Again, Dick, a Veronica Mars digital spinoff series from Thomas, premiered on the CW’s Seed platform. It featured series co-star Ryan Hansen attempting to put together a Dick Casablancas-centered spinoff of Veronica Mars.

Hulu is the second streaming service to pursue a limited series revival of a beloved CW series. Netflix recently brought back Gilmore Girls for four follow-up movies, also from the original creator and featuring the original stars and also produced by Warner Horizon.

Bell is repped by CAA and Bailey Brand Management.